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  • Chris Malburg

What A Working Writer Actually Does


Want to know what a working writer does? Think all we do is sit in a nice, cushy chair creating? Some may. I don't. My work day begins at 0400. I have a sedentary job so I work out until 5:30 or so to stay in shape. Then I get ready for work. My office is downstairs. Today I had an 0600 interview with the PR head of a Swiss watch company (he's in Geneva) for an article I'm doing for Quill & Pad magazine. Click here for an earlier piece I did for them. That's one of MB&F's latest creations, Horological Machine #7 pictured above. Then I had some SEC regulatory work to complete for a securities firm client. That took a few hours. My latest thriller, Man of Honor, is being released Dec. 15 so I wrote two new ads appearing in Quill & Pad magazine and the Air Disaster Investigation newsletter, Curt Lewis & Associates. I had a telephone interview with the CEO of a private equity group in Hong Kong that wants to hire a professional writer with expertise in the watch industry. I'd love to work with them. Spent another hour improving a client's website content. Drafted an ad card for Man of Honor. I also spent too much time on the phone with the actor hired to do the book's voice-over work for the Audible version. Great persona, but he needs a greater sense of urgency to his voice. After all, this book foretells the downing of America's transportation industry by the Chinese PLA's cyber warfare unit. Took a minute to replace a light bulb over my work station. At day's end, I've scheduled two hours to continue developing the scenes for my new project, Barbara Anne's Slider due for release in August 2018. The last thing I do before shutting down for the day is list the agenda for tomorrow so I can hit the deck running. If I could do anything in the world it would be this job. What fun and what an honor to be allowed to entertain my readers.

--Chris

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© 2017 by Chris Shima